Prepare for that Job Interview – Part 2 / Questions About You

Interview Questions About YouJob interviews are always stressful – even for job seekers who have gone on countless interviews. The best way to reduce the stress is to be prepared. Take the time to review the “standard” interview questions you will most likely be asked. Also review sample answers to these typical interview questions.

In addition to reviewing general interview questions, also review job specific interview questions that are designed to assess whether you have the skills required to do the job.

Then take the time to research the company. That way you’ll be ready with knowledgeable answers for the job interview questions that specifically relate to the company you are interviewing with.

In Part 2 of our “Prepare for that Job Interview” Blog, we are reviewing some questions you might get asked about YOU.  For example:

What is your greatest weakness?  

When you’re asked what your greatest weakness is, try to turn a negative into a positive. For example, a sense of urgency to get projects completed or wanting to triple-check every item in a spreadsheet can be turned into a strength i.e. you are a candidate who will make sure that the project is done on time and your work will be close to perfect.

Note that the term “weakness” isn’t used in the sample answers – you always want to focus on the positive when interviewing.

Sample Answers:

  • When I’m working on a project, I don’t want just to meet deadlines. Rather, I prefer to complete the project well ahead of schedule.
  • Being organized wasn’t my strongest point, but I implemented a time management system that really helped my organization skills.
  • I like to make sure that my work is perfect, so I tend to perhaps spend a little too much time checking it. However, I’ve come to a good balance by setting up a system to ensure everything is done correctly the first time.
  • I used to wait until the last minute to set appointments for the coming week, but I realized that scheduling in advance makes much more sense.
  • I would say that I can be too much of a perfectionist in my work. Sometimes, I spend more time than necessary on a task, or take on tasks personally that could easily be delegated to someone else. Although I’ve never missed a deadline, it is still an effort for me to know when to move on to the next task, and to be confident when assigning others work.    I’ve learned to make my perfectionism work to my advantage at work. I am excellent at meeting deadlines, and with my attention to detail, I know my work is correct.
  • I used to like to work on one project to its completion before starting on another, but I’ve learned to work on many projects at the same time, and I think it allows me to be more creative and effective in each one.

What is your greatest strength?

“What is your greatest strength?” is one of the easier interview questions you’ll be asked. When you are asked questions about your strengths, it’s important to discuss attributes that will qualify you for the job. The best way to respond is to describe the skills and experience that directly correlate with the job you are applying for.

Sample Answers:

  • When I’m working on a project, I don’t want just to meet deadlines. Rather, I prefer to complete the project well ahead of schedule.
  • I have exceeded my sales goals every quarter and I’ve earned a bonus each year since I started with my current employer.
  • My time management skills are excellent and I’m organized, efficient, and take pride in excelling at my work.
  • I pride myself on my customer service skills and my ability to resolve what could be difficult situations.

How Will Your Greatest Strength Help You Perform?

As a follow up to being asked about your greatest strengths, you may be asked about how your greatest strength helped your performance on the job. When you respond, relate your strengths to both the job description and your ability to perform at work.

Sample Answers:

  • My greatest strength is my ability to work with many different people. I enjoy learning from everyone I meet, and in this position I believe that will enhance my ability to perform on the team.
  • My greatest strength is my ability to focus on my work. I’m not easily distracted, and this means that my performance is very high, even in a busy office like this one.
  • My greatest strength is my ability to focus on the job at hand. I’m not easily distracted from the big picture.
  • My organizational skills are my greatest strength. I’m capable of keeping many projects on track at the same time.

How would you describe yourself?

Review sample answers to the interview question “How would you describe yourself?” When you respond, keep in mind the type of position you are interviewing for, the company culture, and the work environment. Your answer should help show the interviewer why you’re a match for the job and for the company.

Sample Answers:

  •  I’m a people person. I really enjoy meeting and working with a lot of different people.
  • I’m a perfectionist. I pay attention to all the details, and like to be sure that everything is just right.
  • I’m a creative thinker. I like to explore alternative solutions to problems and have an open mind about what will work best.
  • I’m efficient and highly organized. This enables me to be as productive as possible on the job.
  • I enjoy solving problems, troubleshooting issues, and coming up with solutions in a timely manner.

Describe a typical work week.

Interviewers expect a candidate for employment to discuss what they do while they are working in detail. Before you answer, consider the position you are applying for and how your current or past positions relate to it. The more you can connect your past experience with the job opening, the more successful you will be at answering the questions.

It should be obvious that it’s not a good idea talk about non-work related activities that you do on company time, but, I’ve had applicants tell me how they are often late because they have to drive a child to school or like to take a long lunch break to work at the gym.

Keep your answers focused on work and show the interviewer that you’re organized (“The first thing I do on Monday morning is check my voicemail and email, then I prioritize my activities for the week.”) and efficient.

 Describe your work style.

When you are asked about how you work during an interview, it’s important to impress the interviewer with your competency and accuracy, rather than just your speed.

Here are sample answers to the interview question “How would you describe your work style?”

  • I am very focused on my work, and consequently, am able to work quickly.
  • I keep a steady pace, and check my work as I go along, to prevent mistakes from snowballing.
  • Because I am very organized, I am able to accomplish a lot in a limited amount of time.
  • I’m organized and efficient and I’m able to multi-task very well.
  • I’m always on top of my projects, but I do welcome input and will consult with team members to ensure we’re all on the same track.

Do you take work home with you?

Do you take work home with you is a tricky question, be ready. The longer the answer, the bigger the hole you’ve dug. Don’t waffle and don’t give an overly detailed answer with lots of ifs, ands, or buts.

Best Answer:

When I need to, no problem. I realize the importance of meeting deadlines and getting work done on time.

How many hours do you normally work?

Be careful before you answer questions about how many hours a week you work. You don’t want to be construed as a slacker or as someone who works too many hours. At some companies, the norm is a 40 hour week and everyone goes home on time. At others, everyone might work 50 or 60 hours a week.

However, working a lot of hours isn’t necessarily a good thing – it could mean you’re not productive enough to get the job done in a reasonable amount of time.

So, unless you’re sure about the company culture and expectations, the safest answer is not to mention a certain number of hours. Rather, mention that you work as much as necessary to get the job done.

 How would you describe the pace at which you work?

When you’re asked to describe the pace at which you work, be careful how you respond. This is another question where faster isn’t necessarily better. Most employers would rather hire employees who work at a steady pace. Someone who is too slow to get the job done in a reasonable time frame isn’t going to be a good hire. Neither is a candidate who works frenetically all day.

Options for answering this question include saying that you work at a steady pace, but usually complete work in advance of the deadline. Discuss your ability to manage projects and get them done on, or ahead, of schedule. If you work at a job where you have set criteria (i.e. number of calls made or responded to) that measures accomplishments, discuss how you have achieved or exceeded those goals.

How do you handle stress and pressure?  

A typical interview question, asked to get a sense of how you handle on-the-job stress, is “How do you handle pressure?”.

Examples of good responses include:

  • Stress is very important to me. With stress, I do the best possible job. The appropriate way to deal with stress is to make sure I have the correct balance between good stress and bad stress. I need good stress to stay motivated and productive.
  • I react to situations, rather than to stress. That way, the situation is handled and doesn’t become stressful.
  • I actually work better under pressure and I’ve found that I enjoy working in a challenging environment.
  • From a personal perspective, I manage stress by visiting the gym every evening. It’s a great stress reducer.
  • Prioritizing my responsibilities so I have a clear idea of what needs to be done when, has helped me effectively manage pressure on the job.
  • If the people I am managing are contributing to my stress level, I discuss options for better handling difficult situations with them.
  • I find that when I’m under the pressure of a deadline, I can do some of my most creative work.
  • I’m not a person who has a difficult time with stress. When I’m under pressure, I focus, and get the job done.
  • I find it exhilarating to be in a dynamic environment where the pressure is on.
  • I find a past pace to be invigorating, and thrive when the pressure is on.
  • I’ve done some of my best work under tight deadlines, where the atmosphere was very stressful.
  •  I’m the kind of person who stays calm under pressure, and handles stress fairly easily.

It’s a good idea to give examples of how you have handled stress to your interviewer. That way, they get a clear picture how well you can work in stressful situations.

What motivates you?

There isn’t a right or wrong answer to interview questions about what motivates you. The interviewer is trying to understand the key to your being successful in the job he is interviewing for, and wants to make sure it’s a good fit. Consider, in advance of interviewing, what actually does motivate you and come up with some specific examples to share during the interview.

Your response will vary based on your background and experiences, but, you will want to share your enthusiasm and what you like(d) best about your job.

Here are some examples:

  • I was responsible for several projects where I directed development teams and implemented repeatable processes. The teams achieved 100% on-time delivery of software products. I was motivated both by the challenge of finishing the projects ahead of schedule and by managing the teams that achieved our goals.
  • I’ve always been motivated by the desire to do a good job at whatever position I’m in. I want to excel and to be successful in my job, both for my own personal satisfaction and for my employer.
  •  I have always wanted to ensure that my company’s clients get the best customer service I can provide. I’ve always felt that it’s important, both to me personally, and for the company and the clients, to provide a positive customer experience.
  • I have spent my career in sales, typically in commission-based positions, and compensation has always been a strong factor in motivating me to be the top salesperson at my prior employers.

Are you a self motivator?  

Review sample answers to the interview question “Are you a self motivator?” When you respond, keep in mind that companies are seeking motivated and enthusiastic employees.

Sample Answers:

  • Absolutely. I am a very active person, and I enjoy my work. I’m always looking for new and innovative ideas to bring to a project.
  • I believe I am a self motivator. I give my all to a project, and am always looking ahead to the next one at hand. Successfully completing one and moving on to the next is very exciting for me. I am passionate about my work, and truly enjoy working toward the next big goal.
  • I have always been self motivated. Coming from my background, not very much was expected of me after I finished High School. I always wanted more, and put myself through College and Grad School with very little support from my family. In the workplace, I bring that same drive to managing projects and deadlines.

What are your salary expectations?  

Before you start talking pay (and salary negotiations) with a prospective employer, you need to find out how much the job (and you) are worth. You will need to take the time to research salaries. That way you will be prepared to get what you’re worth and to get a job offer that’s realistic and reasonable.

Salary Negotiations

Once you know what you should be earning, how do you go about getting it? Start by being very patient. When interviewing for a new position, do your best not to bring up compensation until the employer makes you an offer. If you’re asked what your salary requirements are, say that they are open based upon the position and the overall compensation package. Or tell the employer you’d like to know more about the responsibilities and the challenges of the job prior to discussing salary.

Another option is to give the employer a salary range based upon the salary research you’ve done up front. Once you’ve received the offer you don’t need to accept (or reject) it right away. A simple “I need to think it over” can get you an increase in the original offer.

And if you’re ambivalent about the position a “no” can bring you a better offer too. I turned down a position I knew I didn’t want, regardless of salary, and received three follow-up phone calls upping the compensation package. Be careful though, if you do definitely need that new job there’s a risk that the employer may accept your declining the position and move on to the next candidate.

What do you find are the most difficult decisions to make?

There is no right or wrong answer to questions like “What are the most difficult decisions to make?” or “Describe a difficult work situation / project and how you overcame it.” These are behavioral interview questions designed to discover how you handled certain situations. The logic behind these types of questions is that how you behaved in the past is a predictor of what you will do in the future.

Give concrete examples of difficult situations that actually happened at work. Then discuss what you did to solve the problem. Keep your answers positive (“Even though it was difficult when Jane Doe quit without notice, we were able to rearrange the department workload to cover the position until a replacement was hired.”) and be specific. Itemize what you did and how you did it.

The best way to prepare for questions where you will need to recall events and actions is to refresh your memory and consider some special situations you have dealt with or projects you have worked on. You can use them to help frame responses. Prepare stories that illustrate times when you have successfully solved a difficult situation.

Tell me about yourself.

You walk into the interview room, shake hands with your interviewer and sit down with your best interviewing smile on. Guess what their first question is? “Tell me about yourself.”

Do you “wing it” and actually tell all manner of things about yourself? Will you spend the next 5 minutes rambling on about what an easy-going, loyal, dedicated, hard working employee you’ve been? If this is the case, you stand a good chance of having bored your interviewer to death thus creating a negative first impression.

Because it’s such a common interview question, it’s strange that more candidates don’t spend the time to prepare for exactly how to answer it. Perhaps because the question seems so disarming and informal, we drop our guard and shift into ramble mode. Resist all temptation to do so.

Your interviewer is not looking for a 10-minute dissertation here. Instead, offer a razor sharp sentence or two that sets the stage for further discussion and sets you apart from your competitors.

Your Unique Selling Proposition (USP)

Give them “your synopsis about you” answer, specifically your Unique Selling Proposition. Known as a personal branding or a value-added statement, the USP is a succinct, one-sentence description of who you are, your biggest strength and the major benefit that a company will derive from this strength. Here is an example of a Unique Selling Proposition: “I’m a seasoned Retail Manager strong in developing training programs and loss prevention techniques that have resulted in revenue savings of over $2.3Million for (employer’s name) during the past 11 years.”

What a difference you’ve made with this statement. Your interviewer is now sitting forward in her chair giving you her full attention. At this point, you might add the following sentence: “I’d like to discuss how I might be able to do something like that for you.” The ball is now back in her court and you have the beginnings of a real discussion and not an interrogation process.

Be Specific

The key is that you must lead with your strongest benefit to the employer. Be specific and don’t wander about with some laundry list of skills or talents. Be sure to put a monetary value on your work if at all possible and be ready with details when you’re called upon. Give an estimated value to the $$ you’ve either helped to make or save for your employer.

Be Prepared

When you walk into an interview, remember to always expect the “tell me about yourself” question. Prepare ahead of time by developing your own personal branding statement that clearly tells who you are, your major strength and the clear benefit that your employer received. The advantages of this approach are that you’ll quickly gain their attention and interest them in knowing more. You’ll separate yourself from your competitors. You’ll also have a higher chance of being positively remembered and hired.

What has been the greatest disappointment in your life?

Your response to the question “What has been the greatest disappointment in your life?” will help the interviewer determine know how easily you are discouraged.

Best Answer:

If possible, tell about a personal disappointment i.e. the early death of a parent, child, or school friend. Believe it or not, it is okay to have not had a “greatest” disappointment.

What are you passionate about?

When you’re asked what you’re passionate about during a job interview it’s a good opportunity to share what is important in your life. It’s also an opportunity to show your dedication and what’s important to you.

Your response doesn’t need to be work focused, but do be sure that what you share isn’t something that could potential cut in to your working hours.

For example, you don’t want to say that you’re a mountain climber with the goal of climbing Mountain Everest or that you’re getting ready for the Tour de France or looking to spend the winter skiing in Aspen.

Sample Answers: What Are You Passionate About?

  • One of my greatest passions is helping others. When I was younger, I’ve enjoyed helping mom with household repairs. As I grew older, that habit grew and I desired to help others as well. I like helping people find solutions that meet their specific needs.
  • I’m passionate about painting. I take an evening art class once a week and try to find time each weekend to paint. Painting is a good way for me to relax and even though I don’t have much talent, I do it enjoy it.
  • I lost my father to pancreatic cancer and ever since then, I have spent time volunteering to help raise awareness and funding for cancer research. I volunteer for PanCan, the advocacy group, and I’m part of their volunteer network. One of the things I’m passionate is to assist in finding a cure, however I can.
  • I’m passionate about making a difference. When I’m involved with a project at work I want to do my best to achieve success. I feel the same way about what I do in my personal life.
  • I’m an avid skier and I like to spend weekends and vacations on the ski slopes.

What are your pet peeves?

Your response to the question “What are your pet peeves?” will help the interviewer determine if you would be a good fit with the company culture.

Best Answer:

  • I do not have a pet peeve. If something is bothering me, I step back, analyze “why” and find a good solution. If you asked my teenage daughter she would tell you my pet peeve is the volume of her music.

What do people most often criticize about you?

The interview question “What Do People Most Often Criticize About You?” is asked to find out how sensitive to you are and how you accept criticism.

Best Answers:

  • There’s no on-going criticism. I’m open to personal and professional growth and welcome the opportunity to improve.

If humor is appropriate, this is a good time to use it.

Example: I have a teenage daughter – few things I do are okay on her radar screen.

When was the last time you were angry? What happened?  

When the interviewer asks “When Was The Last Time You Were Angry? What Happened?” he or she wants to know if you lose control. The real meaning of the word “angry”, to an interviewer, is loss of control and it’s important to know how you handle situations when you’re angry.

Best Answer:

  • Anger to me means loss of control. I do not lose control. When I get stressed, I step back, take a deep breath, thoughtfully think through the situation and then begin to formulate a plan of action.

If you could relive the last 10 years of your life, what would you do differently?

When asking what you would do if you could relive your life, the interviewer is looking for a flaw in your interview. Always remember, the goal for the first few interviews is to get the next interview. For the interviewer, it is to weed out as many applicants as possible. Here’s where a personal answer could work.

Personal Answer:

  • I lost my mother to Alzheimer’s. I wish I’d known more about the disease to help me through that difficult time.

If the people who know you were asked why you should be hired, what would they say?

When the interviewer asks “If the people who know you were asked why you should be hired, what would they say?” he or she wants to know what your perception is of what others think about your qualifications and abilities.

Best Answer:

  • I’m sure if you asked my friends that question they would say you should hire me because I have the skills outlined in the job description and I bring 10+ years of expertise to this position. Words they’ve used to describe me are: hard working, professional, trusted and a team player.

Do you prefer to work independently or on a team?

When the interviewer asks “Do you prefer to work independently or on a team?” he or she wants to know if you’re a team player or would rather work on your own.

Best Answers:

  • I am equally comfortable working as a member of a team and independently. In researching the LMN company, your mission statement and the job description, I could see similarities to my previous position where there were some assignments that required a great deal of independent work and research and others where the team effort was most effective. As I said, I’m comfortable with both.
  • In high school, I enjoyed playing soccer and performing with the marching band. Each required a different kind of team play, but the overall goal of learning to be a member of a group was invaluable. I continued to grow as team member while on my sorority’s debate team and through my advanced marketing class where we had numerous team assignments.  I’m very comfortably working on a team, but I can also work independently, as well.

Give some examples of teamwork.

A typical interview question to discover how well you would work with other people is “Give some examples of teamwork.”

Sample Answers:

  • In my last position, I was part of a software implementation team. We all worked together to plan and manage the implementation schedule, to provide customer training, and ensure a smooth transition for our customers. Our team always completed our projects ahead of schedule with very positive reviews from our clients.
  • I was part of team responsible for evaluating and selecting a new vendor for our office equipment and supplies. The inter-departmental team reviewed options, compared pricing and service, chose a vendor, and implemented the transition to the new vendor.
  • In high school, I enjoyed playing soccer and performing with the marching band. Each required a different kind of team play, but the overall goal of learning to be a member of a group was invaluable. I continued to grow as team member while on my sorority’s debate team and through my advanced marketing class where we had numerous team assignments.

What type of work environment do you prefer?

When you are asked about work environments, your best bet is to say you’re flexible because, at this stage in the interview process, you don’t know what it will be like working for the company.

Best Answer:

  • I can be flexible when it comes to my work environment. What is the environment in the Engineering department here at RRS, Inc? (Once they’ve described the work environment, include key phrases they’ve used when you describe your preferred work environment).

How do you evaluate success?

Best answer to the interview question “How do you evaluate success?”:

  • I evaluate success in different ways. At work, it is meeting the goals set by my supervisors and my fellow workers. It is my understanding, from talking to other employees, that the GGR company is recognized for not only rewarding success, but giving employees opportunity to grow as well. After work, I enjoy playing softball, so success on the field is catching the winning pop-up.

If you know your boss is 100% wrong about something how would you handle it?

The question “If you know your boss is 100% wrong about something, how would you handle this?” is asked to find out how you deal with a difficult situation.

Best Answers:

An answer that works well is: “It depends on the situation and the personality of the supervisor.” To elaborate, give examples:

  • My present supervisor does not like to have his authority questioned. He’s fairly new on the job and almost all of the people he supervises have been on the job longer than he has. He’s never bothered to learn the procedures, how things are done or how the computer system works. But if any of us tell him that how he wants something done won’t work, he gets extremely angry. So, I never tell him he’s wrong. Never. Whatever he tells me to do, I smile and say “okay.” Then if I know a way to get it done that will work, I do it that way, give him the results he wants and never tell him I didn’t do it the way he told me to. He got the results and is happy. I saved myself the stress of being yelled at and gave him what he wanted, so I’m happy.
  • My prior supervisor was more easy-going and if I told her “you know, I think it might work better if I do what you asked in such and such a way,” she say “okay, try it.”
  • If I were a new hire on a job, I would probably not question a supervisor because I might think I didn’t know enough. Except on the new job I’m going to. The director has admitted that she’s new on the job and there are alot of things that a secretary does that she doesn’t know how to do, so she will be depending on me to know how to keep the office running.

Describe a difficult work situation / project and how you overcame it.

There is no right or wrong answer to questions like “What are the most difficult decisions to make?” or “Describe a difficult work situation / project and how you overcame it.” These are behavioral interview questions designed to discover how you handled certain situations. The logic behind these types of questions is that how you behaved in the past is a predictor of what you will do in the future.

Give concrete examples of difficult situations that actually happened at work. Then discuss what you did to solve the problem. Keep your answers positive (“Even though it was difficult when Jane Doe quit without notice, we were able to rearrange the department workload to cover the position until a replacement was hired.”) and be specific. Itemize what you did and how you did it.

The best way to prepare for questions where you will need to recall events and actions is to refresh your memory and consider some special situations you have dealt with or projects you have worked on. You can use them to help frame responses. Prepare stories that illustrate times when you have successfully solved a difficult situation.

Describe a time when your workload was heavy and how you handled it.

A typical interview question to discover how you manage your work is “Describe a time when your workload was heavy and how you handled it.”

Sample Answers:

  • While at the HKL plant, we were faced with a sudden order increase for the j-ball bearing. It was for a new customer. I immediately sat down with the production supervisor, our materials/supply manager, and the union steward. We were able to lay out a workable plan that maximized hourly costs, guaranteed materials were available and, with only a slight adjustment, meet the production deadline. While it was challenging and involved long hours, the pay-off was a signed contract with a new customer.
  • When I was working on a software implementation team at ABC Company, we took over another company and had to transition many clients to a new product in a short amount of time. It took a lot of planning, time, hard work, and effort, but we were able to complete the project in a timely manner.
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